Horowitz David
Born: 1893
Immigrated: 1921
Arrived: 1923
Residence in the Village:
Departed:
Departed to:
Died: 1965
Belonging to Group
Horowitz Avraham Eliyahu
 
Horowitz Hanna Feige
Ben Zeev Abramovitch (Ben Zeev) Shimon
 
Ben Zeev (Hirshfeld) Beila Gita
    Horowitz David   Horowitz (Ben Zeev) Gretele    
Children:   Waterman (Horwitz) Shimonah    Ratz (Horwitz) Dina    Horowitz Boaz    Wolfenson (Horwitz) Nitza

David Horowitz was born in Latvia in the town of Garoya in the district of Korland. He studies in a Yeshiva and also obtained a general education. He studied bookkeeping and vilin.
As a Russian soldier during World War I he was wounded and taken prisoner by the Germans. He was hospitalized in a hospital in Hanover, Germany, and after he recuperated he worked there as a male nurse. As a result of the good relations he created with the Germans, he succeeded in improving the conditions of the many Jewish prisoners. After the war and until he came to the country he served a chief translator for German and Russian in the headquarters of the Red Cross.
After he was released from the army in 1923 he came to Eretz Israel and joined the "Gedud Ha-Avoda" work force. He was engaged in matters of sanitation and first aid, in the war against malaria and dryingup the swamps in various parts of the country.
He participated in the activities of the "Hagana" during the Arab uprisings in Jaffa.Outstanding among these was his work to reduce the taxes placed upon the farmers and to improve the way they were collected.
On account of his special relations with the mandatory govt.
offices, his efforts in these fields were successful.
During the period of the British Mandate and for some 125 years, he was the official "Muktar" of the village and thus he was responsible for communication with the British authorities and he worked together with various bodies in the village to find solutions for problems that arose during that period. At the same time he was in charge of sanitation for the local council and in this capacity he would regularly check the Shimshon spring to make sure that there were no alarial mosquitoes.
David Horowitz was officiallty recognized by the British mandatory authorities to deal with land registration ?Tabu?, recognition that was only given rarely to individuals who did not have a lawyers license. His activities in this area of land registration, the knowledge he imbibed in this area and his occupational expertise,the trust which the "tabu" clerks placed in him and his knowledge of the details of land values in Rishon Le Zion helped him to be partner to a wide range of activity in the area of agricultural and municipal land registration in the administrative area of Rishon Le Zion. In 1933 he received a letter of thanks and appreciation from the local council for this field of activity.
During World War II David Horowitz participated in a call to the Mandatory power to save the orange growers from their dire situation and to prevent the jailing and sale by auction of their belonging on account of delays in the payment of taxes. Also, because of a lack of grain, and to make it possible for farmers to maintain the upkeep of their kitchen farms he stockpiles the supplies of hay and other requirements for the farmers.
During the War of Independence he participated in the guarding of the village. He was a member of the "Bnei Brith" organization and was the first to collect archival materials in the village.David Horowitz was born in Latvia in the town of Garoya in the district of Korland. He studies in a Yeshiva and also obtained a general education. He studied bookkeeping and vilin.
As a Russian soldier during World War I he was wounded and taken prisoner by the Germans. He was hospitalized in a hospital in Hanover, Germany, and after he recuperated he worked there as a male nurse. As a result of the good relations he created with the Germans, he succeeded in improving the conditions of the many Jewish prisoners. After the was and until he came to the country he served a chief translator for German and Russian in the headquarters of the Red Cross.
After he was released from the army in 1923 he came to Eretz Israel and joined the "Gedud Ha-Avoda" work force. He was engaged in matters of sanitation and first aid, in the war against malaria and dryingup the swamps in various parts of the country.
He participated in the activities of the Hagana during the Arab uprisings in Jaffa.