Levine Asher
Born: 1864
Immigrated: 1885
Arrived: 1885
Residence in the Village:
Departed:
Departed to:
Died: 1956
Belonging to Group
Levine Michal
 
Levine Sima
Goldblat Shmuel
 
Goldblat Golda
    Levine Asher   Levine (Goldblat) Dvorah    
Children:   Haviv (Haviv) Shulamit    Levine Michael    Meirovitch (Levin) Rachel    Levine Shmuel    Levine Gideon    Levine Elisha    Becker (Levin) Serah

Asher Levin was born in Pinsk, Russia. He joined the "Hibat Tzion" movement while still a young man. At the age of 20 he came to Eretz Israel and to arrived Rishon Le Zion two years later.
In the early days of his residence in the village he lived with the Feinberg family and in return for his rent in the attic above the cowshed together with the Arab shepherd, he looked after the cowherd and the cowshed.
Later he worked at removing the "yablit" weed from the lands belonging to Tzvi Levontin and when Baruch Papiermeister came to the village he began working as his estate manager. In return for this work he received his first land property to which he later added.
As a specialist in planting and grafting he planted many orange groves for himself and for others and got the title of being the "first orange grove planter". He planted the grove on the land of the "Ayun Kara" spring (considered by the villagers as the Ayun Kara associated with Samson) near the sand dunes on the western sidebuilding of houses in a new place without a special license, pre- fabricated homes were transported there (the law said that a house with its roof on it would not be demolished) and Asher Levin participated in the transport of those huts to Kastina.
For several years he was involved in the business of building materials and helped in the setting up of many housing estates.
In 1925 he was one of the founding members of a company called "Hameir", a name that used the initials for ?The Development of our Village, Work, Beautifying and Spirit?. The company aimed to set up a new housing estate in the village. Asher Levin, who owned both land and building materials, was placed at the head of the company and indeed put some of his own land at its disposal.
When Rehovoth was founded he again purchased horses and began transporting stone and building materials there. For a period he was also the owner of a "diligance" coach (together with Tzalilihin and Katriel Rappaport).
He bought up several large areas of land and dug wells in all ofthem and planted out plantations in Ness Ziona, Rehovot, Kefar Sava and Beit Dagon. Even the National Institutions took advantage of the fact that he was a Turkish citizen to register land in his name (as well as in the name of Lubman, Tzalillihin and Eizenberg) land properties in Beit Dagon, Ruhama, Kfar Uriah and others, an activity that required time and effort as well as expenses which he took upon himself. To further the acquisition of the land he also participated in the Keren Kayemet Fund what was set up in Rishon Le Zion in 1889. In his diary he relates that the Baron's official, Hazan sent him a note in French in which he certified that Asher Levin was not dependent on the Baron and Asher Levin writes that the note says that ?all the property registered in my name in Rishon Le Zion is my own, acquired by my own hard work and I never borrowed or received a single mil from the Baron Rothschild or his officials?.
In 1898 when Herzl visited Rishon Le Zion the visitor requested to see a home and farm of a farmer whose livelihood came from thework of his hands and was not subsidized by others. The village committee took him to the home of Asher Levin and presented him as an independent farmer.
In 1900 he was one of the founding members of "Pardess" and a member of its board for many years. He was a founding member of the "Kupa Haklait" which, during its early years, had its offices in his home and he was active in its management for many years until he was made its honorary president.
During WWI he was responsible for the public storehouse, supplied the needy and the workers with food and tools and, as such, he succeeded in saving many families from hunger and starvation.
On account of his widely known honesty many gave him their savings without any written documentation or bills of credit. He regularly supported yeshiva students and yeshivot and other charitable organizations. His purse, like his home, was open to all in need. He donated the burial purification building in the old cemetery and when, in 1936, the Rishon Le Zion museum wasfounded he was a signatory to its charter. His abounding energy and celerity were greatly admired and in this connection Moshe Smilansky wrote that one could find him at two opposite ends of the village at one and the same time.
He continued working in his orange groves until a ripe old age.
Only when his legs failed to carry him any more he stopped his work there.Asher Levin was born in Pinsk, Russia. He joined the "Hibat Tzion" movement while still a young man. At the age of 20 he came to Eretz Israel and to arrived Rishon Le Zion two years later.
In the early days of his residence in the village he lived with the Feinberg family and in return for his rent in the attic above the cowshed together with the Arab shepherd, he looked after the cowherd and the cowshed.
Later he worked at removing the "yablit" weed from the lands belonging to Tzvi Levontin and when Baruch Papiermeister came to the village he began working as his estate manager. In return for this work he received his first land property to which he later added.
As a specialist in planting and grafting he planted many orange groves for himself and for others and got the title of being the "first orange grove planter". He planted the grove on the land of the "Ayun Kara" spring (considered by the villagers as the Ayun Kara associated with Samson) near the sand dunes on the western side

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